M. Rogerson

"This is where we’ve ended up and it’s all because of me that we’re here now - hungry, cold, and hunted. I love you mom, dad. I am so sorry. What is that? I’m scared to close my eyes, I’m scared to open them! We’re gonna die out here!"

(Source: britstevenson, via andreii-tarkovsky)

  • Details: How are you different as directors?
  • Fincher: He wraps a lot earlier than I do.
  • Affleck: I just go home by lunch. I gauge a day by how early I go home. No, I mean, I don't put myself really on a par with David in terms of "I'm this, he's that."
  • Details: What was your takeaway from watching David work?
  • Affleck: The biggest thing I learned from David, really, is that he has a kind of insistence on "This is what I want to do, this is how we're going to do it." Because this business has a lot of people saying no—like, "This is going to be too hard" or "This is too expensive" or "No one's going to want to see that" or "We can't have it this way." And I have tended, to my embarrassment, in the past to go, "Oh, you think? Really? We can't do that? I guess we can't do that." And David can push through by force of will what he wants. And I know that the next movie I do, it's going to be colored much more by "Well, this is what I want to do, so we're going to find a way to do it."
  • Details: You'll be an asshole the next time.
  • Affleck: Yeah, I'll be more of a prick. "He was a nice guy till he worked with Fincher."

zombiejig:

The desolate, muddy and potholed urban landscape that Henry walks through at the beginning of the film is now the site of the Beverly Center Mall. 

(via filmforlife)

Playboy: If life is so purposeless, do you feel its worth living?

Kubrick: Yes, for those who manage somehow to cope with our mortality. The very meaninglessness of life forces a man to create his own meaning. Children, of course, begin life with an untarnished sense of wonder, a capacity to experience total joy at something as simple as the greenness of a leaf; but as they grow older, the awareness of death and decay begins to impinge on their consciousness and subtly erode their joie de vivre (a keen enjoyment of living), their idealism - and their assumption of immortality.

As a child matures, he sees death and pain everywhere about him, and begins to lose faith in the ultimate goodness of man. But if he’s reasonably strong - and lucky - he can emerge from this twilight of the soul into a rebirth of life’s élan (enthusiastic and assured vigour and liveliness).

Both because of and in spite of his awareness of the meaninglessness of life, he can forge a fresh sense of purpose and affirmation. He may not recapture the same pure sense of wonder he was born with, but he can shape something far more enduring and sustaining.

The most terrifying fact about the universe is not that it is hostile but that it is indifferent; but if we can come to terms with this indifference and accept the challenges of life within the boundaries of death - however mutable man may be able to make them - our existence as a species can have genuine meaning and fulfilment. However vast the darkness, we must supply our own light.

—Stanley Kubrick in interview for Playboy (via paintgod)

(Source: artfucker1996, via howtocatchamonster)

All I’m saying is that if I ever start referring to these as the best years of my life - remind me to kill myself.”

Dazed and Confused (1993), Richard Linklater.

(Source: missavagardner, via robertdeniro)

cinemasavage:

Dazed and Confused (Dir. Richard Linklater, 1993)

"Behind every good man there is a woman, and that woman was Martha Washington, man, and everyday George would come home, she would have a big fat bowl waiting for him, man, when he came in the door, man, she was a hip, hip, hip lady, man."

(via ciaobelatarr)